thisisnotjapan:

jakobhetzer:

nacktkatze:

Dior ss07 x wave emojiGalliano was inspired by the emoji !

No he was Not its an old Panting called The Great Wave off Kanagawa you fuckboys


nice yellowface 

thisisnotjapan:

jakobhetzer:

nacktkatze:

Dior ss07 x wave emoji

Galliano was inspired by the emoji !

No he was Not its an old Panting called The Great Wave off Kanagawa you fuckboys

nice yellowface 

DC fans are just angry because 8 Marvel movies come out in-between each Batm- I mean DC movie.

Best youtube comment I’ve ever seen


I’ll stop reblogging this when it becomes irrelevant which will be never. 

(via wishingwhileyouwork)

1. Your skin may never be perfect, and that’s okay.

2. Life is too short not to have the underwear, the coffee, and the haircut you want.

3. Everyone (including your family, your coworkers, and your best friend) will talk about you behind your back, and you’ll talk about them too. It doesn’t mean you don’t love each other.

4. It’s okay to spend money on things that make you happy.

5. Sometimes without fault or reason, relationships deteriorate. It will happen when you’re six, it will happen when you’re sixty. That’s life.

Five things I am trying very hard to accept (via aumoe)
The Defining Moment (My Week in DC)

(I started this as a facebook status, but it’s so excessively long)

The Preface

So I was in Washington DC this past week, and it was an journey to say the least. I had no clue what I was getting into, who I would meet, the experiences, connections, or the realizations I would have. It was a culture shock, to say the least. From my lack of basic knowledge of public transportation (AKA getting lost on the metro for over an hour), hailing down taxi cabs, bathrooms with keypads, or reading maps, my Floridian soul could not handle the big city life.

Besides all this, I was in DC for the ECAASU’s Youth Leadership Week in tandem with WHIAAPI’s Youth Forum, and ECAASU’s National Board Retreat.  All of these events had me reflecting and pushing my limits and knowledge of who I am now, who I want to be, and where can I go from here. I have learned three key things from my six days in Washington DC: 

1. I am not alone in the fight.
2. One person can make a difference. 
3. Community can and will be the driving force for change. 

 These are the three common ideas that bridged the entire week together, at least for me. These ideas helped shaped my growth from who I was to who I want to be. 

When I was first thrown down the rabbit hole of social justice, I naturally was angry.

Angry because of injustice.
Angry because no one understood myself and my struggles.
Angry because I felt my voice was silenced.
Angry because of apathy
Angry because everyone told me to be angry.

This internal battle has been a prevalent part of my life for the past year, and within the past few months I have been pushing myself to break my bonds of anger, which has not been easy. In a society that over glorifies being angry as the driving force for change. I felt that without my hatred for the privileged society I would fall into apathy and become what I despised the most, apathetic (which is another story in itself). There was no middle, just extremes. This week, I feel like I can finally say that I can close that door and start a new chapter in my life that is constructive instead of destructive. Building not burning.

The Week

Enough with the intangibles, on to the stories. For various reasons I started the week a day late, so my week started on Tuesday.  I felt that the moment I walked through the door, I belonged. I was thrown into a round table discussion (with a literal round table) about mental health and self care with the wonderful Dr. DJ Ida from NAAPIHMA. It was an uplifting and informal discussion that went into several avenues that lasted two hours longer than it was originally blocked for (so a total of four hours!!). Topics ranged from self care, to being the therapist friend, to harder subjects such as suicide. The dialogue was strongly built on individual stories and experiences, and it had pushed me to think about what I can do on a personal and professional level to promote mental health and self care awareness, as well as being an advocate for others. Without even knowing these people’s names, I learned about their personal struggles, I learned about their friends struggles, and it helped me come to terms about my personal demons. 

The next day focused on policy. This was the more of the ‘running around meeting people’ type of day. The morning focused on voting rights, opportunities, and ways to have the APIA community be a collective voice. From there we went to meet Dr. Franklin Odo at the Japanese Memorial and we talked about the stories behind the creation of the memorial, rang gongs, and listened to Dr. Odo being unintentionally sassy. Afterwards we met with APIA leaders on the Hill and their personal stories of how they got to where they are, and what they are doing now. We ended our day at CAPAL with the topic of coalition building and how we can work together as a community. 

Thursday was Youth Forum with WHIAAPI. Seeing so many APIA youth come together for a common event was uplifting and inspiring. Not only did we focus on different issues such as immigration, mental health, and education. (They also released their new program which can be found here: http://1.usa.gov/Ul5lTN.) We also had dialogue about regional issues (i.e. What are problems the APIA community face in the south opposed to the west coast?), and what can we do to create a positive, sustainable change. 

Lastly, Friday we went to the career fair briefly and wandered the town in the morning, and in the evening we as a collective met up again to talk about our personalities. This day, was one of the highlights of the entire week for me. My sense of self was in overdrive and if having an overwhelming sense of clarity was a thing, then that is what I felt. We had the chance to take a professional level personality test. Most of the time when I take these tests, I generally know what I’m going to get: a dominant, extroverted personality that has lots of vision and is way to sarcastic for her own health and needs to calm down. I used to hate personality tests, because they always focused on why I need to change to conform into the ‘perfect’ leader rather than you are a leader this is your personality, now use what is said here to be more self aware of how your personality effects your decision making and how it can shape your leadership and collaborative styles. Hearing others leadership style opposed to mine and how they interlock with each other, truly helped me grow as a leader in my own community. 

So onto the weekend. So I’m part of the national board called the East Coast Asian American Student Union (ECAASU) and we had our annual retreat. To make this part brief, so the top  secret stuff that we discussed can be protected (i.e. I’m lazy), I will condense a day into a sentence: I am part of a beautiful, talented, wonderful, *insert positive adjectives here* national board who has vision, direction, and wonderful leadership, and y’all better watch out.

The Potpourri of Friends

Wow, this is getting excessive. Anyway, we are almost at the end…I hope, I didn’t write this with any sort of direction. Finally, I want to highlight the connections I have made this past week. (y’all know who you are) I have met wonderful, sassy, intelligent, passionate, and driven individuals that I truly feel like I can call my friends.  Everyone I met, has taught me something different: it could have been patience, how to read a map, how to be a better person, the history of Plymouth, how to make a successful group of musketeers, or even just something about themselves.

The connections and friends I have made will last me a lifetime (I’ll make sure of it) and without them knowing it, they helped me grow as a person, and unintentionally shaped my future and was part of the positive change I want to make in myself. These individuals, these people, my friends are the reason why I know that social change can happen without a focus on anger, but a focus on love. That I can be the one who can make a difference instead of waiting for someone else to make change happen for me. That the good battle isn’t just a party of one. The leaders I have met, the role models they have become, and these people I can call friends are why I know I can be the better version of myself.

My Moment

I feel this shift in my journey.
I sense a turning point.
This week wasn’t just a collection of stories.
It was one of my defining moments.

Epilogue

Hopefully this made some sense. Probably not. I started this post with no intention of writing this much However, I feel this post accurately measures the craziness that was happening in my mind the entire week. I wasn’t sure where it was going, but it ended with lots of positive reflection.

langleav:

Lullabies, the new book by international bestselling author Lang Leav will be released September 16th, 2014. Pre-order at all major bookstores. To get a special discount now, purchase online at Amazon, BN.com and The Book Depository.

how to kiss

kinkydonuts:


[step 1]
open your mouth as wide as possible. make sure to stick out your tongue as far as you can, too, since kisses are like, 90% that thing

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[step 2] find someone to kiss. you will know they want to kiss because their tongue will also be extended at full length

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[step 3] move in for the kill

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lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here

lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here

sextape-movie:

What’s the worst that could happen?

sextape-movie:

What’s the worst that could happen?

24 Ways to Hint To Someone You Like Them

ot888:

lifejoy21:

Whether you’re a guy or you’re a girl and you’re trying to get the other person to notice you, here are 24 ways you’ll never run out of to try! 

24 Ways to Hint To Someone You Like Them

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Wow. The accuracy of this post is astonishing.

pleatedjeans:

via

shego:

people who laugh so hard at their own jokes that they can’t even finish the joke because they’re laughing so hard are my favorite kind of people